May 23-24, 2018
St. Louis, MO

Speakers

Expand/Collapse

Speaker Details Coming Soon

Anizome

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

09.30 | From Microbiome to Medicine: A New Innovation Platform, Dedicated to Animal Health

Sandrine Miller-Montgomery
Executive Director, Centre for Microbiome Innovation & Professor of Practice, BioEngineering
UC San Diego

Dr. Sandrine Miller-Montgomery is the recently appointed Executive Director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation, led by Pr. Rob Knight at UC San Diego. In this position, she is leading a team focused on fostering and expanding industry and academic collaborations, with the mission of accelerating Microbiome discovery and creating innovative technologies that will support this emerging but exploding field in the consumer world as well as enabling major clinical breakthroughs. Previously, she was the CEO of MO BIO Laboratories, a QIAGEN Company, focusing on nucleic acid purification solutions for challenging samples, such as ones found in Microbiome studies. Prior to heading the MO BIO site, Sandrine was their Director of Sales and Marketing, where she led a team, which consistently grew the business at a rate far superior to the market rate. She assisted the 2 original founders and private owners of the company to sell the company when they decided to retire, resulting into its acquisition by QIAGEN, the market leader in Nucleic Acid Sample Preparation.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

09.30 | Using Human as an Animal Model – Lessons Learn from Studying Human Microbiome to Benefit Animal Health

Matthew Koci
Associate Professor, Immunology, Virology & Host-Pathogen Interactions
NC State

Matt got his undergraduate degree from Virginia Tech in Biology before going to get a MS in Infectious Diseases and a PhD in Veterinary Pathology at the University of Georgia.  After a short post-doc at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Medical Microbiology and Immunology he joined the faculty at NC State.  There he works on host-pathogen interactions, focusing mostly on enteric viruses and bacteria.  Over the past 14 years his group has focused on developing methods of promoting gut health and immunity through manipulation of the microbiome.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

14.00 | Connecting the Who with the Where and the What to Understand the Why

Aaron Ericsson
Director, MU Metagenomics Center
University of Missouri

Dr. Ericsson obtained his DVM with honors from the MU College of Veterinary Medicine in 2006. Following a three-year residency in the MU Comparative Medicine Program, he completed a PhD studying interactions between the innate immune system and gut microbes using mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease and colitis-associated colorectal cancer. He is Director of the MUMC and also currently serves as lead scientist on microbiota research for the NIH-funded MU Mutant Mouse Resource and Research Center (MMRRC) and Rat Resource and Research Center (RRRC). He has expertise in animal models, metagenomics, mucosal immunology, and microbiology.

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

14.00 | Potential Prophylactic and Therapeutic Probiotics in Companion Animals

Scott Carter
Director, Business Development
Baylor College of Medicine

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

10.00 | Panel Discussion: Product Development & Registration of Live Bio Therapeutics in Animal Health

Amy Biddle
Assistant Professor
University of Delaware

Dr Amy Biddle’s research focuses on the equine gut microbiome in health and disease.  The Biddle Lab launched the Equine Microbiome Project in 2015, the first large-scale survey of the equine gut microbiome. As a growing collection of gut microbe and horse health data, the EMP database is being used to identify patterns between the equine microbiome and factors such as age, diet, exercise, and metabolic state. Related projects in the Biddle Lab include in vitro assessment of equine gut community structure and function in response to various perturbations. Other research in her lab involves understanding taxa differences in cyathostomin parasite taxa related to dewormer resistance.

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

14.30 | The Equine Microbiome Project: Building a Long Term Future to Study Equine Health

Christopher Belnap
CEO
Resilient Biotics

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

10.00 | Panel Discussion: Product Development & Registration of Live Bio Therapeutics in Animal Health

09.00 | Novel Therapeutic Discovery in Animal Health

Joseph Petrosino
CSO and Director, Alkek Center for Microbiome Research
Diversigen and Baylor College of Medicine

Joseph F. Petrosino, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Molecular Virology and Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine and the Director of the Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research. He holds joint appointments in the Human Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Ophthalmology, and is a member of the Cell and Molecular Biology and Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine programs. He obtained his undergraduate degree in microbiology and immunology with a distinction in research from the University of Rochester, followed by a PhD degree in microbiology and immunology from Baylor College of Medicine. He completed postdoctoral fellowship training in genetics at Baylor College of Medicine and was a Research Associate in the Human Genome Sequencing Center working on the functional genomics of biodefense and emerging infectious disease.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

12.30 | Advances in the Human Microbiome and Key Learnings for Animal Health

Holly Ganz
CEO
AnimalBiome

Holly is a microbial ecologist with a BS from George Washington University, a MS from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and a PhD from UC Davis. She was a postdoctoral fellow at UC Berkeley. Prior to creating AnimalBiome, she studied microbes in dogs and cats at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and the UC Davis Genome Center.

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

13.30 | Mining Microbiome Data to Create Better Diagnostics to Identify and Manage Chronic Health Conditions in Companion Animals

Janet Donaldson
Associate Professor and Department Chair
University of Southern Mississippi

Dr. Donaldson is an associate professor at the University of Southern Mississippi. Her work is focused upon determining novel methods to improve survival of a host against food-borne pathogens.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

15.30 | Probiotics as Alternatives for Antimicrobials and Improving Energy Availability

Jeff Brockman
Principal Scientist
Hills Pet Nutrition

As the principal scientist in genomic technology at Hill’s Pet Nutrition, Jeff has over twenty years of post-doctoral, technical, and management experience in the biotechnology and animal health industries, specializing in genomics. Jeff has a broad background in developing genomic and genetic programs to identify biomarkers of disease, disease risk and therapeutic efficacy, the identification of biological targets for therapeutic intervention, and the analysis and interpretation of genomic and genetic studies.

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

13.00 | Host-Microbiome Interactions: Influencing the Function of the Dog Microbiome Through Nutiriton to Impact Health and Behaviour

Jeffrey Watts
Research Director - External Innovation
Anti Infectives, Zoetis

As Research Director of External Innovation at Zoetis, Jeffrey’s primary responsibilities include the identification of novel substrate through collaboration with external institutions that will support the development of novel, veterinary spectrum specific agents. Prior to his work at Zoetis, Jeffrey worked at Pfizer Animal Health for over 10 years in helping the discovery of novel pharmaceuticals.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

08.30 | Advancing Microbiome Based Leads Into and Through the Pipeline

John Gregg
CEO
BalinBac Therapeutics

John Gregg leads  BalinBac Therapeutics, "The Microbiome Optimization Company", a biopharmaceutical organization that will transform the treatment of gastro-intestinal conditions in humans and livestock animals. Responsible for corporate vision, strategy, & execution of projects that will revolutionize weight control in people and livestock animals as well as innovatively advancing the treatment of debilitating and deadly GI / infectious diseases.

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

11.00 | A History of Regulating Animal Health Products: Adapting Effectively for the Microbiome

Megan Lyman
IP, Regulatory and Product Development
AgTech Acclerator

Megan Lyman is IP/Regulatory Counsel at AgTech Accelerator in RTP, North Carolina.  She provides diligence in scouting new companies across technologies in agriculture, as well providing IP and regulatory strategy and implementation to AgTech’s portfolio companies. Starting her legal career at Jones Day, Ms. Lyman practiced in IP litigation and prosecution before opening her own practice in North Carolina.  With a focus in the life sciences, Ms. Lyman assisted scientists and businesses alike in the creation and implementation comprehensive IP and regulatory strategies.  Her clients were guided from the initial stages of patent landscaping and freedom to operate, to patent prosecution, through Inter Partes Review, licensing, and general counsel needs.

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

11.30 | How to Harness Novel Microbiome Opportunities and Build a Robust IP Strategy

Megan Niederwerder
Assistant Professor
Kansas State University

Dr. Megan Niederwerder is an Assistant Professor at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine in the Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology.  She received her DVM from Kansas State University and after 3 years as a practicing veterinarian, Dr. Niederwerder returned to Kansas State where she completed a PhD in viral diseases of swine.  Dr. Niederwerder’s research is focused on understanding how the microbiome plays a role in outcome following viral infection in pigs and how feed plays a role in the introduction and transmission of viral diseases.  She was selected as a finalist for the 2016 AVMA Young Investigator Award for her research.  Dr. Niederwerder serves as the course coordinator for Veterinary Virology and enjoys teaching the second year veterinary students about viral diseases.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

12.00 | Role of the Microbiome in Swine Respiratory Disease

Michael Kogut
Lead Scientist/Research Microbiologist
USDA-ARS

Dr. Kogut has been an active and productive researcher for over 30 years, the last 24 of which have been with the USDA-ARS.  He is currently a Research Microbiologist and Lead Scientist of the project plan entitled “A Systems Biology Approach to Understanding the Salmonella-host Interactome in Poultry and Swine” managed within the Food and Feed Safety Research Unit at the Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, College Station, Texas.  As Lead Scientist, Dr. Kogut coordinates scientific activities of participating scientists; evaluates and recommends changes to the project; prepares annual reports; provides technical information and consultation pertaining to assigned projects, both internal and external to ARS.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

11.30 | Manipulation of the Microbiome to Modulate Immunity

Mike Seely
CEO
Ascus Biosciences

Mike Seely has spent over 10 years helping start/launch, drive business development strategy, setup product marketing, and distribution, and/or establish and maintain support operations with a number of deep science platform companies.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

09.00 | The Next Wave of Innovation in Animal Health

Nathan Mcnulty
Vice President of Research
Matatu

Day Two

Thursday May 24, 2018

10.00 | Panel Discussion: Product Development & Registration of Live Bio Therapeutics in Animal Health

Steve Bartle
Director of Livestock Research
BalinBac Therapeutics

Dr. Bartle is retired Research Director of the Beef Cattle Institute at Kansas State University.   Dr. Bartle’s training is in ruminant nutrition with an emphasis on beef cattle.  His career started with 10 years as a research scientist at Texas Tech University.  This was followed by 18 years in the feed industry in product research and development, and technical sales.  Dr. Bartle returned to academia for 4 years at KSU.  He is author or co-author of 50 peer-reviewed publications and numerous technical reports.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

11.00 | Overview of Current Beef Industry, Management Practices, and Opportunities for Microbiome Impacts

Tim Johnson
Associate Professor
University of Minnesota

Dr. Tim Johnson is a Professor of Microbiology at the University of Minnesota. He received his PhD in Molecular Pathogenesis from North Dakota State University in 2004, followed by postdoctoral studies at Iowa State University's College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Johnson joined the University of Minnesota's Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences in 2007. He has since developed an internationally-recognized research and outreach program focused on the genetic mechanisms enabling the spread of antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. In tandem, his work focuses on the identification of antibiotic alternatives that manipulate the animal microbiome allowing for enhanced growth and reduced disease. Dr. Johnson has been working towards defining the baseline gut and respiratory microbiomes in chickens and turkeys, finding bacteria that correlate with enhanced performance, and developing alternative-to-antibiotic strategies using this knowledge. Tim also currently serves as Director of Research and Development at the Mid-Central Research and Outreach Center's Poultry Research Laboratory in Willmar, MN.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

15.00 | Microbiome-Based Approaches for Probiotic Development in Poultry Production

Todd Callaway
Assistant Professor
University of Georgia

Dr. Todd Callaway is a member of the faculty of the Department of Animal and Dairy Science at the University of Georgia.  Todd is a ruminant microbiologist who grew up on a small horse, dairy, and beef farm and received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Georgia in Animal and Dairy Science in 1993 and 1996, respectively.  He then went on to receive his Ph.D. degree in Microbiology from Cornell University in 1999.  Dr. Callaway’s research in graduate school focused on how the bacteria in the rumen of cattle could adapt and become resistant to ionophores, and how ionophore usage could be enhanced or replaced using non-antibiotic approaches.

Day One

Wednesday May 23, 2018

14.30 | Probiotics, the Microbiome, and a Functional Approach to Future Applications to Improve Food Safety, Animal Health, and Productivity